Your book’s front cover may get someone’s attention, but your book’s back cover copy gets their money. That copy can make or break your book promotion. Learn how to write amazing copy.

Intro Transcript

James: In this episode, we’re going to talk to you about back cover copy. So really the question we have to ask folks, is does a book cover sell a book? It does and it doesn’t. Not usually. Most of the times, a book cover sells you on the idea of reading the back cover copy, or if you’re on Amazon or online, that description that’s on the page. That’s where the real selling takes place. So how do you write compelling back cover copy? That’s what we’re going to explore today in today’s episode.

So Thomas let me ask you, is that what sells you on a book? Is it the back cover copy? Is it the cover? Is it a combination?

Thomas: Probably half the time, it’s the back cover and the other half of the time it’s the reviews, either from my friends or from people I trust. Or the aggregate of reviews online.

James: Ok so you’ll read the reviews, so it’s a combination of those things.

Thomas: Right. But if I typically won’t read the reviews if the back cover copy has not caught my attention. So if I’m bored by the back cover copy, you’ve lost me. You’ve lost the chance to sell me your book.

James: Okay, so for you, it sounds like you’re a lot like me. I’ll look at the cover and if I see it looks “wow this looks like somebody did it who does not have graphic design experience” like we’ve talked about in the previous episode two episodes back, then if it looks good you’ll go to the back cover copy, you’ll read the back cover copy, then you’ll take a look at some reviews and that’s your process?

Thomas: That’s right. And for me, I don’t read paper books. So it all happens online. So when we say “back cover copy” this is the text that goes next to your book photo on Audible or on Amazon.com. It’s the paragraph of text that describes why people should read your book.

James: Okay. Well, you and I are the same. I look at that cover then I read the back cover copy or the description online, and then I’ll go and take a look at it. I never really actually read the 5 star and 4 star reviews, I go to the 1 star immediately because I want to see what the criticisms are and at that point, I make the decision. So I guess we’re both saying the same thing, that back cover copy or the description online is absolutely critical in selling your book. So our advice to you is, do not gloss over this. Spend the money to make this right because this is really the key component in getting somebody to buy your book.

Thomas: That’s right. So Jim, what do we do, how does somebody write better back cover copy? What are the copywriting secrets of James L Rubart?

Other than the cover, your back cover copy is the most crucial part of your novel marketing.

TLDR:

  • Do not gloss over this.
  • Spend the money to get it done right.

James: Well this is actually hard, Thomas, for me, as we were putting together this episode it was kind of like “this is something I’ve been doing for 25 years, so it’s one of those things that comes naturally, you don’t really think about it or you don’t think that much about your process. So I had to really think and drill down and go “okay what do I do when I’m writing back cover copy for other authors or writing my own back cover copy?” and so these are the things that I realize I do instinctually and it’s things that our listeners can do as well. So let’s go through those points.

What is back cover copy?

TLDR:

  • It’s a sale pitch, it’s the ad for your book
  • In movie terms, it’s a trailer, so it’s the trailer for your book

First of all, what is back cover copy? We talked about it, but it is THE sales pitch, it is really the ad for your book. If we were talking in movie terms, it is the trailer for your book.

Thomas: It’s also the starting point for the other advertising that you’re doing. So if you are going to do Amazon ads, or Goodreads ads, the text for those ads is going to come from your back cover copy. So this thinking that you’re doing doesn’t just affect this one part of your marketing, it affects everything. If someone were to do a magazine ad for your book, the first place they would start to build that ad is the copy on the back of your book.

James: That’s a great point. They’re going to use this, or even other people who love your book are going to use this sometimes too advertise your book for you. So it becomes the resource, it becomes the hub for all of your other advertising.

Shorter is Better

TLDR:

  • 140 – 170 words is the sweet spot

First thing when you’re thinking about back cover copy is, shorter is better. To get specific, really you want your back cover copy to come in somewhere around 140, 170 words. Now if you can do it in 5 words, great. But it usually takes a few more words than that. But once you get up to 170 or moving towards 200 words, it’s simply getting too long. And this is the biggest mistake I see most of the time when I’m working with other authors on their back cover copy.

They want to get the whole book in there and they want 300 words on the back cover. You just can’t put that much in, you can’t put that much in your Amazon description or your Barnes & Noble description online because people will just stop reading.

Thomas: Yeah. And really, the first few words of that copy are the most important. Because each sentence has to sell the next sentence, so to speak, and make them even more curious.

Set The Mood 

TLDR:

  • Match the “voice” of the bcc with the “voice” of the book
  • Again, think about a movie trailer.
  • A romance movie trailer has a different feel than a thriller.
  • What mood do you want to set? It needs to match your book.

 

James: That’s exactly right. This is not the time to have a dull sentence. This is the time for every word to be carefully looked at. And how those interact with other words. The other thing back cover copy does is it sets the mood. You want to match the voice of the back cover copy with the voice of the book. If it’s a thriller, you need to write in a thriller mood.

If it’s a romance you’re going to write in a romance voice on that back cover copy. Again, think about a movie trailer. A romance movie trailer’s going to be very different from a thriller or an adventure or a sci-fi trailer. So what mood do you want to set? It needs to match the mood of your book.

Thomas: And those of you writing nonfiction, it still needs to match the voice of your book. So if you’re very brash and brazen in your writing, you want to be brash and brazen in the back cover. So you’re making a promise ultimately with that text and then you have to deliver on that promise. So you want to make the right promise that resonates with readers and then you have to deliver on the promise in accord with the book.

Don’t put every worm on the hook

TLDR:

  • You want the fish to bite, you don’t want them to get so full they leave
  • You give away enough, but not too much.
  • This is your second date.

James: That’s really good, Thomas. The next thing you need to think about is that you’re fishing for readers and you don’t want to put every worm on the hook. You want to get the fish to bite. You don’t want to get them so full that they leave. In other words, you give away enough, but not too much, and there’s a fine line between that. There’s a debate going on right now about the Star Wars movie coming out— oh my gosh, they’ve told too much, and I refuse to watch the trailer.

I’m going to go to the movie, I don’t need you even to do a trailer for me, but in the case of your book, you DO need to do a trailer, you DO need to show those people enough that they go “oh my gosh, I have to open up this cover and at least read it on Amazon” or physically [read the book] you can do that. I need to go a little bit further into this, or as Thomas and I were saying, we want to be pushed down to the reviews.

It’s hooked us enough that we want to jump into those reviews. So you want to tell enough but not too much.

Thomas: Another way to think of this is, you’re dating your potential reader. So the front of your book, the front cover, is your first date. And if you had a good impression, you get asked to a second date, which is them reading the back of your book. That is still not them proposing to marry you. So the next step, date #3 is reading the first sentence and starting to read your book.

And if they’re still there on page 2 or 3 in the bookstore, or if they’ve gotten to the end of the Kindle Instant Preview, and they still want to know what happens next, then they’re ready to propose. And so you don’t want to say everything in the second date; you want to leave them wanting more so that they’ll then go on to start reading your book

Don’t bury the lead.

TLDR:

  • What is the headline, the hook? What is the “What if”?
  • Jim’s first novel Rooms: “What would you find if you walked into the room of your soul? One man is about to find out.”
  • The Chair: If you were given an ancient looking chair and told Jesus Christ made it, would you believe them?

James: That’s exactly right. The next point we want to talk to you about is don’t bury the lead. I was working the other day with an author on his back cover copy and what we realized is he’d buried a very cool lead. This was actually a nonfiction book. We pulled the lead out and all of a sudden the back cover copy took on so much more excitement.

So the question to ask yourself is “what is the headline, what is the hook?” This is when we’re talking about high concept. What is the “what if?” question that your novel is asking? For example, my first novel, Rooms: this is the headline on the back cover copy: “What would you find if you walked into the room of your soul? One man is about to find out.” So we literally asked the “what if” question that is the core of the book.

What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul?

One man is about to find out.

That’s the headline. That’s hopefully where somebody goes “oh, I have to read a little bit more.”

For my third novel, The Chair, the question there was “what if you’re given an ancient-looking chair and told Jesus Christ made it? Would you believe them?” Again, we’re trying to find a headline that hooks people and makes them go “ooh that’s interesting, I have to read the next line.”

Thomas: Yeah, that’s really good. And again, there’s no way for you to really know if you’ve succeeded or not; you’re going to have to get an outside perspective. It’s easy to see when someone else has got it, but you’re too inside your own story to know if you’ve got the right hook for the fish. So one thing you may want to consider is, not just having your beta readers look at your story but also have your beta readers look at your hook. Like, save some people who haven’t read your book, to read the back cover copy to tell you “is this catching my attention or are you getting bored” that sort of thing.

James: I want to just repeat that, Thomas, just to emphasize that that is such great advice. We’re good at giving our stories to beta readers to read the story, but the potential readers are never going to get to the story unless that back cover copy sings. So do save trusted people that know nothing about your book, give them the back cover copy and go “did you get it? What impressions did you get out of this? Is this something you want to read now?” Get those opinions cold. Because that’s how the majority of your readers are going to approach your story.

After setting the hook, introduce a bit of context

TLDR:

  • Introduce the Who/Where/When
  • Get to the conflict (the What) quickly. This is the driving force of your story.
  • The Why or How are the interesting details that should only be hinted at.
  • We’re not trying to tell the story with the back cover copy, we’re trying to intrigue readers with WHAT the story is.
  • Is your hero seeking freedom? Power? Acclaim? Sacrifice?
  • What thirst will you satiate for your readers?
  • Name the main characters, if you can set their age
  • The Invitation
  • The Twist
  • Write bcc for a book you read recently

Jim: The next step after setting the hook with the “what if” question is you introduce a little bit of backstory or context. This is the who, the what, the where, the when. But we want to get to the conflict, which is the WHAT, quickly.

The what is really the driving force of your story. The WHY and the HOW are the interesting details that should only be hinted at. In other words, we’re not trying to tell the entire story with the back cover copy, we’re not trying to tell the story really at all.

What we’re trying to do is intrigue readers with the WHAT that the story is. So is your hero seeking freedom? Are they seeking power? Are they seeking acclaim? Are they going to sacrifice? What thirst will you satiate for your readers with your story? But first , atiate with your back cover copy.

Thomas: A great way to practice this is, take the last novel that you read and write some back cover copy for it. And then go and compare what you wrote to what they have on Amazon, especially if it’s a traditionally-published book and they have their back cover copy written by a professional. This is a really great way to practice and score your copywriting skills, to see if you are able to find that core essence of the story or what that point of conflict is that then drives people to want to learn more.

James: That is a great exercise, Thomas. I love that. You could actually become fairly skilled just doing that. If you’re writing back cover copy for books you’ve read, that will teach you a great deal when you approach your own back cover copy, and I love that.

So, a couple other things you’re going to do in your back cover copy, and then we’re going to give you an example. Because this is all theory, and it would be good to give you some specific examples of back cover copy, and where the what, how, when, why, were placed in that copy.

You’re going to name the main characters. You want to let us know who this person is, who the hero of the story is. And if you can, set their age or give an approximation of what their age is. That’s going to tell your reader a lot. Then, what we call the Invitation. What are you inviting them into, what’s the story or the adventure that you’re inviting your readers into. And then finally the twist. There’s always going to be a twist in good back cover copy that makes you go “oh! Oh, now I’ve got to at least read the first introductory paragraph or sentence.”

 

Example #1 Rooms

What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul?

One man is about to find out.

It was just a letter. Cryptic, yes absolutely. But Seattle software tycoon Micah Taylor (WHO/CHARACTERIZED)

can’t get it out of his mind—the claim that a home was built for him by a great uncle he never knew, (INVITATION)

on the Oregon coast. In Cannon Beach. (WHERE)

The one place he loves. The one place he never wants to see again. (BACKSTORY)

Micah goes to Cannon Beach intending to sell the house and keep his past buried, but the nine thousand square-foot home instantly feels like it’s part of him. (WHAT)

Then he meets Sarah Sabin at the local ice cream shop … maybe Cannon Beach can be the perfect weekend getaway. (AGE)

But strange things start happening in the house. (WHAT)

Things Micah can’t explain. Things he can barely believe. All the locals will say is the house is “spiritual.” (WHAT)

Unsettling since Micah’s faith slipped away like the tide years ago. (BACKSTORY)

And then he discovers the shocking truth: the home isn’t just spiritual, it’s a physical manifestation of his soul. (TWIST)

James: So, this an example from my first novel Rooms which I already mentioned. So the headline is, as you already know, “What would you find if you walked into the rooms of your soul? One man is about to find out.”

Now here’s the back cover copy after the headline:

It was just a letter. Cryptic, yes absolutely. But Seattle software tycoon Micah Taylor —

James: —this is WHO and this is characterIzation; now we know the name of the hero and we understand that he’s a software tycoon. So we understand the industries he’s in, that gives us a little bit of context, also we know he’s a Seattle software tycoon, so now we have setting, we’re grounded somewhere.

Thomas: And we know his age, approximately. He’s not a teenager and he’s probably not an old man.

James: He’s probably not. That’s exactly right, Thomas. We have a feeling, we’re probably going to go “ah, tech software, he’s probably anywhere from mid-20s, maybe he’s as old as mid-40s” but he’s definitely not a teenager, like you said, and he’s definitely not an old man.

–can’t get it out of his mind—the claim that a home was built for him by a great uncle he never knew,

James: —So here’s our invitation, right? Micah’s being invited to find this home that was given to him by a great uncle, and as a reader we’re invited into that as well.

on the Oregon coast. In Cannon Beach.

James: Here’s our WHERE. Okay, now we know where this adventure is going to take place.

The one place he loves. The one place he never wants to see again.

James: This is backstory. Now we’re getting a little bit of the backstory on, we don’t know why he hates the place, we don’t know why he loves the place, but we’ve got some backstory that ties into his motivations or his fears or his hesitations.

Micah goes to Cannon Beach intending to sell the house and keep his past buried, but the nine thousand square-foot home instantly feels like it’s part of him.

James: Again, now we have a WHAT. What is going on? Why does he feel like it’s part of him? Next–

Then he meets Sarah Sabin at the local ice cream shop…

James: Major character named, introduced, now we’re intrigued by the relationship that could or could not happen between Micah and Sarah.

…maybe Cannon Beach can be the perfect weekend getaway.

James: Again, we’ve said age, not that middle age people or older can’t have romance, but typically in novels, someone that’s having a romance is going to be in that 20s to 30s age range.

But strange things start happening in the house.

James: Again, that’s a WHAT.

Things Micah can’t explain. Things he can barely believe. All the locals will say is the house is “spiritual.”

James: Again, that’s a WHAT. How is the house spiritual? We’re not sure. We’re intrigued to find out.

Unsettling since Micah’s faith slipped away like the tide years ago.

James: Now we’re giving a little bit more backstory. That’s intriguing to us. And then finally…

And then he discovers the shocking truth: the home isn’t just spiritual, it’s a physical manifestation of his soul.

James: Boom. That is the twist, where we go “oh my gosh, I didn’t see that coming.” The home is his soul??? Yeah, he’s walking into the rooms of his own soul. Boom, we’re done. And at that point we hope the reader is intrigued enough to want to go deeper.

Example #2 Harry Potter

“Till now there’s been no magic for Harry Potter. (BACKSTORY/HOOK)

He lives with the miserable Dursleys and their abominable son, Dudley. (AGE)

Harry’s room is a tiny closet beneath the stairs, and he hasn’t had a birthday party in eleven years. (BACKSTORY/AGE)

But then a mysterious letter arrives by owl messenger: a letter with an invitation to an incredible place called Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. (WHAT)

And there he finds not only friends, flying sports on broomsticks, and magic in everything from classes to meals, but a great destiny that’s been waiting for him (WHAT)…

if Harry can survive the encounter.” (TWIST)

James: Yeah, here’s an example from a book that’s sold a few copies. And I’m not going to tell you the name of it, I think you’ll figure it out pretty quick.

“Till now there’s been no magic for Harry Potter.

James: — okay what has been done in that very short sentence? Number one, it’s backstory, no magic up until this point. And what a hook! What do you mean there’s no magic? You mean there’s going to be magic? You mean there’s probably going to be magic, what kind of magic? So we’ve already gotten some backstory and we’re already hooked.

He lives with the miserable Dursleys and their abominable son, Dudley.

Now this tells us immediately what, Thomas?

Thomas: It gives us a sense of his age. Again, it doesn’t tell us exactly he’s six years old, but he’s probably a young man, living with his family. He’s not going to be in his 40s most likely.

Nowadays that happens more than it used to (laughs) but typically in fiction if you’re a hero, you’re not still living with your parents, or if you are, you’d say he’s STILL living with his miserable aunt and uncle. But it doesn’t say that, it says he LIVES with the miserable Dursleys.

James: Exactly. Then the back cover copy goes on to say:

Harry’s room is a tiny closet beneath the stairs,

So we have backstory and we have context now. Now we can imagine this little boy living in a closet? Oh my gosh, we have compassion for him and then it says

and he hasn’t had a birthday party in eleven years.

James: Oh my gosh! Now we have massive compassion for this kid, we now know how specifically old he is, he’s 11 years old so that gives us backstory and age. And then the copy continues on:

But then a mysterious letter arrives by owl messenger: a letter with an invitation to an incredible place called Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Here’s our WHAT. Ooh, now we’re intrigued. What is this? How does Harry get there?

Thomas: And they have you now already. So, I’m already sold on this book. They keep layering the interest, making me more and more interested, but they still have two more sentences to set the knife and then twist it. So, keep going…

And there– referring to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry– he finds not only friends, flying sports on broomsticks, and magic in everything from classes to meals, but a great destiny that’s been waiting for him

James: So now you’re like “oh my gosh, so he’s finally going to get friends, finally going to get people that come around him, finally he’s going to be seen for who he is and drawn out into this great destiny,” but then, waiting for him…

… if Harry can survive the encounter.” (TWIST)

James: Boom, and there’s your twist. What do you mean, survive? I thought he was going to go to this great place and make friends and step into his destiny, and then suddenly there’s this twist. Something or someone is after him. And we at that point are hooked.

Thomas: Now, notice how they don’t introduce Hermione or any of the other characters. This is very, very focused just on Harry Potter, which is key. Remember, this is only the second date! It’s not introducing all of the other characters, it’s just introducing Harry and giving you just enough to make you curious.

This doesn’t take you much past what, chapter 1, chapter 2? I don’t know early into the book he gets to his wizarding school, but very quickly you’re past the back cover copy and you have no idea what’s going to happen next. This is very well-written back copy which probably helped contribute to the millions and millions of sales that this book led to.

A simple way to think about back cover copy

TLDR:

  • The High Concept
  • The heart of the story
  • The payoff

James: I would think so. So, this is how I think about back cover copy, it might help you as well, you’re really introducing three acts. Let’s say you have the high concept, WHAT IF, the question, the heart of the story which we’ve gone through with two examples here, and then the payoff. And the payoff is really that twist of “oh my gosh, I’ve got to find out more about it.” Again, the high concept, the heart of the story, the payoff. That might help you as you’re writing your own back cover copy.

Read the copy of other novels in your genre.

Thomas: And take some books in your genre and take the back cover copy and do what we just did in this episode. At the end of each sentence, describe in parentheses (and we’ll have it on the Novel Marketing website, we’ll have both of these back cover copies with the what backstory who, kind of breakdown. You can find that at novelmarketing.com/111 for the show notes for episode 111.

So if you’re writing romance, we don’t have an example here and we don’t have time this episode to do an example for every single genre. Go to some of the bestselling books in your genre and take their back cover copies and break them down. And figure out exactly what they’re doing and how they’re selling it, and what the high concepts are, what is the heart of the story, and then what is the payoff that they’re promising?

Should you hire someone?

TLDR:

  • It’s a skill that takes a long time to master.
  • You CAN learn it, but it will take time.
  • Usually it is better to hire outside help.

James: A few more tips before we let you guys go: if one of the questions is to hire someone or not, hire someone! Back cover copy is something that takes years and years and years to learn to do. I’m not saying you can’t do it and Thomas isn’t saying you can’t learn to do it.

You CAN learn to do it, and even if you don’t do it all yourself, if you hire someone to assist, what Thomas is suggesting and what we’re suggesting is still worthwhile. The better you understand it, the better you can critique someone that potentially you’ve hired to do that cover copy

Should you do the “ask a question at the end” technique?  

TLDR:

  • Generally, no

James: Here’s a question, Thomas, that is about questions at the end of back cover copy. A lot of times you’ll get the question, “will Billy and Sally get together or will her dad push them apart?” and I’m somebody who hates that question at the end.

A lot of people love them and I see them on a lot of novels. I am not a fan of that, because I go “well of course they’re going to get together.” We know that. Don’t spoil the surprise for me. How do you feel about questions at the end of back cover copy?

Thomas: It can work but often I think it’s an indication of lazy writing. It’s the easiest thing to do and that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s the right thing to do. I think it can be used effectively so I’m not ready to say “never put questions in your title” but often they’re kind of like Woody’s Roundup.

If you remember from Toy Story 2, you know, “Woody’s Roundup” and he’s racing to Prospector Pete and he jumps over the chasm and it’s like “WILL WOODY SURVIVE AND RESCUE PROSPECTOR PETE?” and it’s like oh my goodness, it just makes it too dumb.

If you’re writing for children, that could work, or in certain circumstances it could work, but you have to be really careful not to be the Mystery Theater guy, like “TUNE IN NEXT TIME TO FIND OUT”. That’s not the feel I suspect you want for your book, at least for most of you.

Don’t Use Clichéd Copy

TLDR:

  • “A life changing book!” “Must read!” “You won’t be able to put it down.”
  • Summoned out of our world …
  • A race against the clock
  • A hard-boiled cop …

James: That’s a great point. This is something that we probably don’t need to say but let’s just say it anyway…Avoid the cliched copy. A life-changing book, or “SUMMONED OUT OF OUR WORLD,” a race against the clock, a hardboiled detective” — those things have been used so much that they have become cliche.

And you’ll see them on best-selling books. They’re put in there, to reference Thomas’s comment a few seconds ago, that’s lazy writing. Watch out for those cliches that have been used over and over again.

Avoid Typos

TLDR:

  • Typos on your back cover kill sales.

Thomas: Another thing you want to avoid is typos. This is where you want to have as many eyes as possible because if you have typos in your back cover copy, this isn’t a negative review that you get, it’s no sale at all. This really costs you money.

So make sure you just don’t have an editor but you also have a proofreader looking over the typeset version of your back cover copy, so you have watchmen on the watchers, so to speak, to make sure there are zero typos. I hear stories of people saying “oh my gosh there was a typo in the blurb on Amazon, I’m never buying from this author.”

Use White Space

TLDR:

  • Use headlines, bullet points (more non-fiction than fiction) short paragraphs. Make it easy to read. Open/white space makes it easy to read.
  • Shorter sentences are usually better

James: Yeah. That’s a great point Thomas. A couple more. Break up your back cover copy. Use headlines, use bullet points, and this is more for nonfiction than fiction, but we know we have a lot of nonfiction listeners as well. So, make it a bullet point, short paragraphs, easy to read, open and white space makes it easier to read. You hear this advice a lot on blog posts. Same thing in back cover copy. Don’t jam it all together in one long run on paragraph.

Thomas: In fact this is one of the ways that you can spot a self-published book that’s been very poorly done, is that authors often have too much back cover text, and the text fills the whole back cover. There’s no negative space. You’ve got to have that white space. You have to have some area on the back of your book with nothing in it, believe it or not. And not too much– it needs to be well-done, but you can’t just squeeze every single pixel is another letter.

Makes the Reader Want More

James: And just a reminder, the last sentence of your back cover copy, just like the last sentence in every chapter, the last sentence in your book, it makes the reader want more. Show biz, right? Always leave the audience wanting more, so they have to flip open the book and read that first sentence. And if that’s done well, then odds are you’re going to sell a lot more books.

Avoid Passive Voice

Thomas: And one final point: avoid passive voice in your back cover copy. There may be times you can get away with passive voice  in your writing, but you need these sentences to be very, very tight, with no extreme-use words. If you go back and look at that Harry Potter example, every single one of those sentences, there’s not a single wasted word. There’s not a single word that could be cut. They got it down to its core.

Sponsor

James: That’s right. So, the sponsor of today’s episode of Novel Marketing is brought to you by MyBookTable. Now the price on MyBookTable, I think it’s a fantastic price, Thomas, wouldn’t you agree? Free? Did you say free? Now that is a great price.

Thomas:  I was actually just working on a website earlier today and using MyBookTable, and it is very, very robust in what it can do. And one of the neat things is you can import books from Amazon. So I was putting together a site for somebody who had over a dozen books, and instead of having to create each book page by hand, I connected it to Amazon and I just pasted in the ISBN numbers and the ASIN numbers for the ones that were just ebooks, and it pulled in the back cover copy, the cover, and the author if there’s multiple authors it pulled all of those in and it built all of the pages for me in about 30 seconds.

So, connecting with Amazon took a little bit of work. I had to get an API key from Amazon but that was free, and once that was done it all came over. And I was more or less done. I just tweaked the pages at that point . It’s a really great experience and if you’re wanting to take your website to the next level and make it more effective at selling books, go to MyBookTable.com to try it out.

Ask a Question

James: And remember, if you have a question for us, shoot it our way. We’’ll either write back to you directly or we might end up using your question for our next Q&A extravaganza.

 

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